LACOL 2021 June Workshop
Call for Presenters!!
Virtual Talks/Panels/Posters
Proposals invited by April 2

CALL FOR PRESENTERS. The LACOL 2021 Steering Committee invites proposals from members–faculty, staff, and students–to present and share their practices, methods, experiences, and findings related to blended learning, digital research and innovations, inclusive and equitable teaching and learning, and the transformative uses of technology. 

Embracing the notion of “play and innovation” in the liberal arts broadly, LACOL 2021 seeks proposals for panels, roundtable, interactive virtual workshops, and/or virtual poster sessions.

For guidelines and dates and to submit a proposal, see:
https://conferences.hamilton.edu/lacol2021/call-for-presenters

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LACOL 2021 Play and Innovation

Consortium-wide LACOL Workshop
June 21-23 virtually @ Hamilton College

For Full details on the Workshop Program, Schedule, and Registration, see: https://conferences.hamilton.edu/lacol2021

Call for Presenters open through April 2
Workshop Registration opens in April

Hamilton College looks forward to hosting the summer 2021 consortium-wide LACOL, June 21-23, 2021.  With “Play and Innovation” as the official 2021 theme, this summer gathering will bring together faculty, technologists, research librarians, academic support specialists, and other educators and students for collaborative exchange and playful discussion. (more…)

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LACOL 2021 Keynote: Bryan Alexander (June 21)

Featured Keynote Day 1:

Gaming and Liberal Education
June 21 @ 1:30pm Eastern via Zoom

Dr. Bryan Alexander
Futurist and Author, Academia Next
@BryanAlexander

Registration for the LACOL 2021 Virtual Workshop will open soon.  Watch 👀 this space.

Bryan Alexander is an awardwinning, internationally known futurist, researcher, writer, speaker, consultant, and teacher, working in the field of higher education’s future.

He completed his English language and literature PhD at the University of Michigan in 1997, with a dissertation on doppelgangers in Romantic-era fiction and poetry.

Then Bryan taught literature, writing, multimedia, and information technology studies at Centenary College of Louisiana.  There he also pioneered multi-campus interdisciplinary classes, while organizing an information literacy initiative. (more…)

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LACOL 2021 Keynote: Heather Pleasants (June 22)

Featured Keynote Day 2:

Reimagining the Future(s) of Learning: Play in Speculative Spaces
June 22 @ 1:30pm Eastern via Zoom

Dr. Heather Pleasants
Educational Consultant, Experiential Learning & Assessment
University of Texas at Austin, @heatherplez

Registration for the LACOL 2021 Virtual Workshop will open soon.  Watch 👀 this space.

Dr. Heather Pleasants is a faculty development and senior assessment specialist at the University of Texas at Austin, where she works with faculty interested in making experiential learning a part of their courses. She is also an educational researcher and consultant who specializes in providing needs assessment, program evaluation, and external evaluation of funded initiatives—particularly those that address issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion. Dr. Pleasants received her PhD in Educational Psychology (2000) with a specialization in Language, Literacy, and Learning from Michigan State University. She is a regular contributor to the work of the Digital Pedagogy Lab, and her most recent publication is Digital Storytelling in Higher Education: International Perspectives (2017).

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LACOL 2021 Keynote: Catherine D’Ignazio (June 23)

Featured Keynote Day 3:

Data Feminism
June 23 @ 1:30pm Eastern via Zoom

Dr. Catherine D’Ignazio
Assistant Professor, Department of Urban Studies
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Author, Data Feminism (with L. Klein), @kanarinka

Registration for the LACOL 2021 Virtual Workshop will open soon.  Watch 👀 this space.

As data are increasingly mobilized in the service of governments and corporations, their unequal conditions of production, their asymmetrical methods of application, and their unequal effects on both individuals and groups have become increasingly difficult for data scientists–and others who rely on data in their work–to ignore. But it is precisely this power that makes it worth asking: “Data science by whom? Data science for whom? Data science with whose interests in mind? These are some of the questions that emerge from what we call data feminism, a way of thinking about data science and its communication that is informed by the past several decades of intersectional feminist activism and critical thought. Illustrating data feminism in action, this talk will show how challenges to the male/female binary can help to challenge other hierarchical (and empirically wrong) classification systems; it will explain how an understanding of emotion can expand our ideas about effective data visualization; how the concept of invisible labor can expose the significant human efforts required by our automated systems; and why the data never, ever “speak for themselves.” How can we operationalize intersectional feminist thinking in order to imagine more ethical and equitable data practices? This talk will focus in particular on examples of play, innovation and emancipatory pedagogy in data science. (more…)

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Antiracist Pedagogy – Student Perspectives

LACOL 2020 Virtual Workshop – Summer Dialogues

Student Perspectives on Trauma-informed, Anti-racist,
Remote Teaching and Learning

Resources proliferate on how to prepare for remote teaching and learning that is equitable, inclusive, and anti-racist, but where are students’ perspectives and voices in the mix?

See also: Fall 2020 brown bag series: https://lacol.net/student-led-brown-bags-fall-2020/

In August 2020, Student Partners working in the Summer Pedagogical Partnership Program at Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges led a series of semi-structured conversations with faculty and staff across LACOL.  Pairs of these students partnered throughout the summer with cohorts of faculty to support their pedagogical planning for the Fall-2020 semester.

As part of this work, the Student Partners read resources and identified what they think matters most in developing trauma-informed, anti-racist, remote teaching and learning. These points shared below served as a basis for the 1-hour small group conversations via Zoom.

Feedback from faculty participants highlighted the value of these discussion as they plan for the fall:
“We shared resources and ideas…so I feel like we walked away with tangible strategies and tools to apply to our remote work in a more equitable way.”

 

“It really made a difference for my course prep, and overall well-being as a faculty member living through these challenging times.”

 

“The students modeled the kind of non-judgmental openness to questions, concerns, and ideas that they recommended we exhibit in the classroom. I have a long set of notes taken during the meeting that I am eager to implement when I’m next teaching.”
Likewise, reflections from student partners capture important threads in these conversations:
“[This work] opened my eyes to the incredible number of things professors have to consider and worry about when planning a course, which is definitely going to help me consider others’ perspectives in an out-of-the-box way.”

 

“…talking with faculty partners and student partners has more thoroughly convinced me that a lot of misunderstandings or dissatisfactions among students and faculty could be remedied or clarified by faculty being more direct and transparent about their reasons for adopting certain practices, assignments, and course policies, and by asking students to share their feelings and feedback directly.”

 

“I have found a voice and a language with which to communicate with faculty and have/facilitate conversations that previously felt out of the realm of things I could do. I think I have learned a lot of important facilitation strategies that I carry with me into other work. I aim to apply this language, knowledge, and skills to other work across disciplines to open space for more accessible and equitable conversations and practices.”

(more…)

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Anti-Racist Pedagogies and Facing the Pandemics of Racism and Covid in the Classroom

LACOL 2020 Virtual Workshop

Session Description: The 2020 pandemic of Covid has revealed anew the perpetual pandemic of racism. What does anti-racist pedagogy look like during this moment? How is the intersection of Covid and movements for racial and social justice prompting you to rethink your goals and purpose in the classroom? Join us for a facilitated conversation and workshop that aims to open up space for self-reflection, imagination, and application in anticipation of the start of Fall classes.

Date: 
Aug 27, 2020
Time: 12:00 pm – 2:00pm Eastern
Location: Zoom

Readings: 

Facilitators:
  • Alison Cook-Sather, Professor of Education, Director of Teaching and Learning Institute, Bryn Mawr College
  • Chanelle Wilson, Assistant Professor of Education, Director of Africana Studies, Bryn Mawr College
  • Jonathon Kahn, Professor of Religion, in-coming Director of the Engaged Pluralism Initiative, Vassar College
  • Candice Lowe-Swift, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Director of the Engaged Pluralism Initiative, Vassar College

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LACOL 2020 Virtual Workshop

LACOL 2020 Revised Program May 11 – August 27:

In light of COVID-19, the LACOL 2020 Consortium Workshop has moved to a fully online format this summer. A small number of real-time sessions in Zoom will be paired with asynchronous options unfolding over time. See program details below.

Program: LACOL 2020 Virtual Workshop Agenda
Registration:  Closed

LACOL 2020 Forum Gateway: https://bit.ly/lacol-2020-forum (workshop registration required)
Workshop Calendar: https://bit.ly/lacol-2020-grid

Program Highlights – May 11 thru Aug 27 online (more…)

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How to Change Institutions with Purpose


Matthew Rascoff, Associate Vice Provost for Digital Education and Innovation, Duke University

Emily J. Levine, Associate Professor of Education, Stanford University

Keynote: How to Change Institutions with Purpose
Date and Time: June 30, 2020, 1:00pm-2:30pm Eastern Time
Online Location: Zoom webinar
Related Reading:

In February 2020, the coronavirus crisis forced Duke Kunshan University’s students and faculty to scatter across the globe and move online.  Duke University, DKU’s US partner, was soon to follow as the arrival of the global pandemic triggered a near universal pivot to remote instruction. Matthew Rascoff whose digital innovation team guided the institution through both these rapid transitions noted:

Even as educational institutions are threatened, learning continues. And perhaps even grows. But it does so in new spaces.

In the LACOL 2020 closing keynote How to Change Institutions with Purpose, Matthew Rascoff (Duke University) and Emily Levine (Stanford University) will draw on their research collaboration into the history of education and innovation to probe how mission-driven liberal arts institutions can adapt and change in the face of extraordinary challenge. (more…)

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LACOL 2020 Small Teaching Online Mini-Workshop

Special Event

Webinar: Small Teaching Online with author Flower Darby
Author and Presenter: Flower Darby, Assistant Dean of Online and Innovative Pedagogies at Northern Arizona University
With Special Guest: Alison Cook-Sather, Professor of Education, Bryn Mawr College; Director, Teaching and Learning Institute
Date and Time: June 15, 11:00am – 12:30pm Eastern
Location: Zoom
Read it together: LACOL Virtual Reading Group – Small Teaching Online

 

A. Cook-Sather, Bryn Mawr College

Small teaching is a phrase coined by Professor James M. Lang to describe an incremental approach to improving instruction. In 2019, instructional designer Flower Darby and Lang teamed up to apply small teaching principles to the online realm.  The result of their collaboration is an essential volume for any educator: Small Teaching Online: Applying Learning Science in Online Classes.

As a highlight of the LACOL 2020 virtual workshop,  Darby will lead an online mini-workshop, exploring small steps with big impacts for students.

The book recommendation is excellent – a lot of useful suggestions which would take years to figure out.
                           -Dr. Natalia Toporikova, Washington and Lee University;
biology professor and online data science instructor, summer 2019, 2020

Establishing presence and social learning through multi-modal engagements and reflective meta-cognition are effective techniques for *any* class, both face-to-face and through the internet.  Communicating the underlying what, why and how of learning is especially important for online learning success.  And, like any important new skills, acquiring these capabilities takes planning and practice.

(more…)

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LACOL 2020 Summer Data Science Panel

Session: LACOL 2020 Summer Data Science Panel
Date and Time: June 22, 1:00pm-2:30pm Eastern
Discussion Leads: Ella Foster-Molina (Swarthmore College)Monika Hu (Vassar College), Moataz Khalifa (Washington and Lee University), Steven J. Miller (Williams College), Natalia Toporikova (Washington and Lee University)

Now in its second year, Introduction to Data Science is a fully-online summer class co-taught by a multi-campus LACOL team. The class is designed as a collaborative, socially relevant, discussion-oriented online classroom experience in the style of liberal arts colleges.

(more…)

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Building Community Online – Lessons Learned from Carleton CUBE

Session: Building Community Online – Lessons Learned from Carleton CUBE
Date and Time: June 19, 12:00pm-1:30pm Eastern
Lead: Melissa Eblen Zayas, Professor of Physics Director & Perlman Center for Learning and Teaching, Carleton College

Running annually since 2016, Carleton College’s CUBE program is a fully-online summer bridge experience designed to support entering students in developing their quantitative skills.  A great benefit of the program has been the discovery of numerous ways to build a sense of community among the online cohort and connect students to campus, before they arrive on campus.

(more…)

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Bryn Mawr’s Blended Learning in the Liberal Arts – CFP is Open!

cropped-blendlac_logo_resized-2CALL FOR PROPOSALS – submit by Feb 16!

Blended Learning in the Liberal Arts Conference at Bryn Mawr College, May 20-21, 2020.

Submissions are now open for the Blended Learning in the Liberal Arts Conference, to be held on May 20-21, 2020 at Bryn Mawr College. We are open to all topics related to blended learning in the liberal arts. Possible themes include:

  • Digital competencies, digital citizenship, and digital wellness
  • Experiential and service learning
  • Blended learning spaces, libraries and resource centers
  • Critical making
  • Emerging technologies
  • Task-based tech-mediated learning
  • Assistive technology and accessibility
  • Blended learning beyond the single course
  • Diversity, equity, and inclusion in blended experiences

Submit by Feb. 16, 2019 at brynmawr.edu/blendedlearning/conference. Contact Jennifer Spohrer at blendedlearning@brynmawr.edu with questions.

Follow @BlendLAC

 

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Data Science in the Liberal Arts Workshop (June 2019)

Event: Data Science in the Liberal Arts
Date & Location: June 6-7, 2019 at Washington and Lee University
Workshop Goals:

  • Agenda & Program (Background and Purpose)
  • Establishing a Think Tank on Data Science in the Liberal Arts
  • Taking hands on approaches to curating, developing, and sharing liberal arts pedagogies and teaching materials for data science that broadly engage and support our students across the disciplines.

Attendees: members and friends of the LACOL DS+ working group

Scroll down for workshop resources, slides, and video gallery

Keynote Talk:

Data Journalism as a Liberal Art
Prof. Amelia McNamara

Department of Computer & Information Sciences
University of St. Thomas

One of the main ways the general public encounters products of data analysis is through journalism. Data journalists strive to explain complex stories using visualization, statistics, and heavy use of contextualization. As we incorporate data science into the liberal arts, data journalism provides a case study as a field in which the sciences and the humanities are consciously linked. In this talk, I’ll discuss the history of data journalism, how I see it fitting into a liberal arts framework, and experiences from a class I taught on data journalism.

A. McNamara SLIDES

More Workshop Talks and Resources:

1. R. DeVeaux – Data Science for All? 

2. L. Heyer – Starting a Data Science Minor

(more…)

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Cultivating Student Leadership in a More Inclusive Liberal Arts Classroom

Mini-Conference: Cultivating Student Leadership to Foster a More Inclusive Liberal Arts Classroom
Location: Amherst College Center for Teaching and Learning (Frost Library)
Date: April 5, 2019
Agenda: Student Leadership – April 5 Agenda

Invited Speaker: Bryan Dewsbury, University of Rhode Island
amherst CTLHost: Amherst College Center for Teaching and Learning in partnership with Being Human in STEM and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion (more…)

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