Student-Led Brown Bags, Fall 2020

Student Perspectives on Trauma-informed, Anti-racist Teaching and Learning in Hybrid and Remote Contexts

THIS FALL, YOU ARE INVITED to join a series of weekly brown bags led by student partners on Trauma-informed, Anti-racist Teaching and Learning in Hybrid and Remote Contexts. These multi-campus discussions expand on the high-impact Summer 2020 Student-led Dialogues as semi-structured, open conversations with LACOL colleagues in a small group format. 

The importance of the topic is high in our current moment, as argued in this opinion piece.

With fall courses in progress now, the student partners will engage in aspects with direct relevance to the hybrid/remote classroom, building on a set of curated and annotated resources, prompts, and activities to facilitate discussions based on interests expressed by discussion participants. (more…)

Read More

LACOL 2021 Play and Innovation

Consortium-wide LACOL Workshop
June 21-23 in person and virtually @ Hamilton College

Hamilton College looks forward to hosting the summer 2021 consortium-wide LACOL, June 21-23, 2021.  With “Play and Innovation” as the official 2021 theme, this summer gathering will bring together faculty, technologists, research librarians, academic support specialists, and other educators and students for collaborative exchange and playful discussion. (more…)

Read More

Intermediate German Digital Link-Up (Fall 2020)

Prof. Simon Swarthmore College

Professors Sunka Simon and Matthew Miller teach Intermediate German as an intensive language class that meets four days a week on campus at Swarthmore College and Colgate University respectively. The curriculum is built to enhance the four language skills (oral, aural, reading and writing composition) through a combination of up-to-date, authentic print and audio-visual geo-political and cultural material to move students from A2 to B1 level proficiency within the span of one semester. Both classes work from a textbook (e.g. Stationen) that integrates Landeskunde (learning about the specificities of German-speaking regions and cities) with B1-level grammar and vocabulary lessons.

Prof. MillerColgate University
Prof. Miller
Colgate University

We carved out the potential of holding a synchronous class together once a week as a joint web conference. Asynchronously, cross-college teams of students will prepare didacticized assignments consisting of blog-posts, a discussion forum and Zoom video-conferencing tools utilizing newly acquired linguistic concepts to react to consecutive weekly episodes of German-language original dramas such as Dark, Skylines, Dogs of Berlin or Berlin Babylon. The semester will culminate with a virtual symposium and/or video-essay student presentations.

On the benefits of linking courses across two campuses, Professor Simon notes:

Our linked class creates a broader cohort of language learners. We are “in it together.”

As the course wraps up, digital student projects will be shared with the LACOL language community, including web-published symposium papers and final video essays.
(more…)

Read More

Antiracist Pedagogy – Student Perspectives

LACOL 2020 Virtual Workshop – Summer Dialogues

Student Perspectives on Trauma-informed, Anti-racist,
Remote Teaching and Learning

Resources proliferate on how to prepare for remote teaching and learning that is equitable, inclusive, and anti-racist, but where are students’ perspectives and voices in the mix?

See also: Fall 2020 brown bag series: https://lacol.net/student-led-brown-bags-fall-2020/

In August 2020, Student Partners working in the Summer Pedagogical Partnership Program at Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges led a series of semi-structured conversations with faculty and staff across LACOL.  Pairs of these students partnered throughout the summer with cohorts of faculty to support their pedagogical planning for the Fall-2020 semester.

As part of this work, the Student Partners read resources and identified what they think matters most in developing trauma-informed, anti-racist, remote teaching and learning. These points shared below served as a basis for the 1-hour small group conversations via Zoom.

Feedback from faculty participants highlighted the value of these discussion as they plan for the fall:
“We shared resources and ideas…so I feel like we walked away with tangible strategies and tools to apply to our remote work in a more equitable way.”

 

“It really made a difference for my course prep, and overall well-being as a faculty member living through these challenging times.”

 

“The students modeled the kind of non-judgmental openness to questions, concerns, and ideas that they recommended we exhibit in the classroom. I have a long set of notes taken during the meeting that I am eager to implement when I’m next teaching.”
Likewise, reflections from student partners capture important threads in these conversations:
“[This work] opened my eyes to the incredible number of things professors have to consider and worry about when planning a course, which is definitely going to help me consider others’ perspectives in an out-of-the-box way.”

 

“…talking with faculty partners and student partners has more thoroughly convinced me that a lot of misunderstandings or dissatisfactions among students and faculty could be remedied or clarified by faculty being more direct and transparent about their reasons for adopting certain practices, assignments, and course policies, and by asking students to share their feelings and feedback directly.”

 

“I have found a voice and a language with which to communicate with faculty and have/facilitate conversations that previously felt out of the realm of things I could do. I think I have learned a lot of important facilitation strategies that I carry with me into other work. I aim to apply this language, knowledge, and skills to other work across disciplines to open space for more accessible and equitable conversations and practices.”

(more…)

Read More

Sharing Courses in Self-Instructional Language Programs through Online Conversation (Fall 2020)

Renewed for Fall 2020!

vassarwilliams

In an increasingly globalized world, students are seeking ways to learn languages that are not commonly taught at schools in the United States. While self-instructional language programs (SILP) afford many opportunities to explore lesser-taught languages like Hindi, Korean, or Swahili, the scope of each program is limited. A new online collaboration will allow each program to tap into resources that other colleges in the consortium have, e.g. native speakers in the community that can serve as tutors, or advanced level instruction in certain languages. Students will have additional opportunities to explore new paths within their liberal arts education.

Many of the colleges within the consortium offer some form of guided self-instruction of lesser-taught languages already. The new LACOL project will launch a collaboration between the Self-Instructional Language Programs at Vassar, and Williams College, using online synchronous classroom-to-classroom interaction. As Lioba Gerhardi, Vassar’s Coordinator of the Self-Instructional Language Program and Adjunct Assistant Professor of German Studies says:

By sharing resources, the partners will be able to increase the number of self-instructional languages available to students in an innovative and cost-effective manner.

The self-instructional component of each language course will remain unchanged. Each student will enroll for the course at their home institution. For speaking and listening practice, students will join conversational tutorial sessions at a partnering college via video conferencing software, such as Zoom.

(more…)

Read More

Anti-Racist Pedagogies and Facing the Pandemics of Racism and Covid in the Classroom

LACOL 2020 Virtual Workshop

Session Description: The 2020 pandemic of Covid has revealed anew the perpetual pandemic of racism. What does anti-racist pedagogy look like during this moment? How is the intersection of Covid and movements for racial and social justice prompting you to rethink your goals and purpose in the classroom? Join us for a facilitated conversation and workshop that aims to open up space for self-reflection, imagination, and application in anticipation of the start of Fall classes.

Date: 
Aug 27, 2020
Time: 12:00 pm – 2:00pm Eastern
Location: Zoom

Readings: 

Facilitators:
  • Alison Cook-Sather, Professor of Education, Director of Teaching and Learning Institute, Bryn Mawr College
  • Chanelle Wilson, Assistant Professor of Education, Director of Africana Studies, Bryn Mawr College
  • Jonathon Kahn, Professor of Religion, in-coming Director of the Engaged Pluralism Initiative, Vassar College
  • Candice Lowe-Swift, Associate Professor of Anthropology, Director of the Engaged Pluralism Initiative, Vassar College

Read More

LACOL 2020 Virtual Workshop

LACOL 2020 Revised Program May 11 – August 27:

In light of COVID-19, the LACOL 2020 Consortium Workshop has moved to a fully online format this summer. A small number of real-time sessions in Zoom will be paired with asynchronous options unfolding over time. See program details below.

Program: LACOL 2020 Virtual Workshop Agenda
Registration:  Closed

LACOL 2020 Forum Gateway: https://bit.ly/lacol-2020-forum (workshop registration required)
Workshop Calendar: https://bit.ly/lacol-2020-grid

Program Highlights – May 11 thru Aug 27 online (more…)

Read More

How to Change Institutions with Purpose


Matthew Rascoff, Associate Vice Provost for Digital Education and Innovation, Duke University

Emily J. Levine, Associate Professor of Education, Stanford University

Keynote: How to Change Institutions with Purpose
Date and Time: June 30, 2020, 1:00pm-2:30pm Eastern Time
Online Location: Zoom webinar
Related Reading:

In February 2020, the coronavirus crisis forced Duke Kunshan University’s students and faculty to scatter across the globe and move online.  Duke University, DKU’s US partner, was soon to follow as the arrival of the global pandemic triggered a near universal pivot to remote instruction. Matthew Rascoff whose digital innovation team guided the institution through both these rapid transitions noted:

Even as educational institutions are threatened, learning continues. And perhaps even grows. But it does so in new spaces.

In the LACOL 2020 closing keynote How to Change Institutions with Purpose, Matthew Rascoff (Duke University) and Emily Levine (Stanford University) will draw on their research collaboration into the history of education and innovation to probe how mission-driven liberal arts institutions can adapt and change in the face of extraordinary challenge. (more…)

Read More

LACOL 2020 Small Teaching Online Mini-Workshop

Special Event

Webinar: Small Teaching Online with author Flower Darby
Author and Presenter: Flower Darby, Assistant Dean of Online and Innovative Pedagogies at Northern Arizona University
With Special Guest: Alison Cook-Sather, Professor of Education, Bryn Mawr College; Director, Teaching and Learning Institute
Date and Time: June 15, 11:00am – 12:30pm Eastern
Location: Zoom
Read it together: LACOL Virtual Reading Group – Small Teaching Online

 

A. Cook-Sather, Bryn Mawr College

Small teaching is a phrase coined by Professor James M. Lang to describe an incremental approach to improving instruction. In 2019, instructional designer Flower Darby and Lang teamed up to apply small teaching principles to the online realm.  The result of their collaboration is an essential volume for any educator: Small Teaching Online: Applying Learning Science in Online Classes.

As a highlight of the LACOL 2020 virtual workshop,  Darby will lead an online mini-workshop, exploring small steps with big impacts for students.

The book recommendation is excellent – a lot of useful suggestions which would take years to figure out.
                           -Dr. Natalia Toporikova, Washington and Lee University;
biology professor and online data science instructor, summer 2019, 2020

Establishing presence and social learning through multi-modal engagements and reflective meta-cognition are effective techniques for *any* class, both face-to-face and through the internet.  Communicating the underlying what, why and how of learning is especially important for online learning success.  And, like any important new skills, acquiring these capabilities takes planning and practice.

(more…)

Read More

LACOL 2020 Summer Data Science Panel

Session: LACOL 2020 Summer Data Science Panel
Date and Time: June 22, 1:00pm-2:30pm Eastern
Discussion Leads: Ella Foster-Molina (Swarthmore College)Monika Hu (Vassar College), Moataz Khalifa (Washington and Lee University), Steven J. Miller (Williams College), Natalia Toporikova (Washington and Lee University)

Now in its second year, Introduction to Data Science is a fully-online summer class co-taught by a multi-campus LACOL team. The class is designed as a collaborative, socially relevant, discussion-oriented online classroom experience in the style of liberal arts colleges.

(more…)

Read More

Building Community Online – Lessons Learned from Carleton CUBE

Session: Building Community Online – Lessons Learned from Carleton CUBE
Date and Time: June 19, 12:00pm-1:30pm Eastern
Lead: Melissa Eblen Zayas, Professor of Physics Director & Perlman Center for Learning and Teaching, Carleton College

Running annually since 2016, Carleton College’s CUBE program is a fully-online summer bridge experience designed to support entering students in developing their quantitative skills.  A great benefit of the program has been the discovery of numerous ways to build a sense of community among the online cohort and connect students to campus, before they arrive on campus.

(more…)

Read More

Liberal Arts Lecture Exchange (hosted by LACOL)

Liberal Arts Remote Lecture Exchange

LACOL is hosting a Liberal Arts Lecture/Lesson Exchange.  This concept was proposed by faculty at our member schools and is starting to roll out as a response to remote teaching needs.The exchange is open to the liberal arts community. Consider contributing!

Liberal Arts Remote Lecture Exchange

Post to the exchange: http://bit.ly/lac-remote-lesson-form

View the list: http://bit.ly/lac-remote-lesson-exchange

Read More

March 2020: Liberal Arts Remote Teaching (hands-on webinar)

WEBINAR EVENT

Dates/Time for Live Sessions:

  • Tuesday, March 17, 2020 – 1:00pm-2:00pm Eastern [FULL]
  • Thursday, March 19, 2020 – 11:00am-12:00pm Eastern  [FULL]

Sign Up: CLOSED
Handouts and Demo Gallery: http://bit.ly/lac-teach-webinar-report
Remote Teaching Tips: http://bit.ly/lacol-teach-online

This LACOL webinar shares hands-on practice with five experienced liberal arts teachers from Swarthmore College, Vassar College, Williams College, and Washington and Lee University.  This team regularly collaborates to deliver online/hybrid classes for the liberal arts.

Description: Many liberal arts colleges are asking faculty to consider how they move their teaching online as part of emergency preparedness in the face of COVID-19 or other disruptions to regular classroom teaching.  Tips and guides are circulating, and faculty get lots of support from their local IT and teaching and learning centers. (more…)

Read More

Call for Proposals – LACOL course sharing framework (2018 – 2021)

Attention Faculty!
2020 Call for Proposals is Open!

Do you have an idea for a digitally shared (hybrid/online) or team taught course?

The Liberal Arts Collaborative for Digital Innovation (LACOL) invites proposals from its members for small grants to fund creative and collaborative projects in the liberal arts. Proposals and accepted and reviewed on a rolling basis.  Areas of particular interest include:

  • Digitally Shared Courses
  • Effective Digital and Inclusive Pedagogies
  • Data Science / Quantitative Skills
  • Language Instruction

Contact your local LACOL Faculty Advisory Council Representative for more information and how to apply.

Or email LACOL to pitch your idea!  [See also: proposal template, budget template]

Background: Exec Summary / Call for Proposals (PDF)

About the Exploration

Sharing courses as a consortium can enhance curricular opportunities for students and faculty, lead to efficiency gains by combining expertise and curricular resources, and provide opportunities for our faculty and students to explore digitally-enhanced, collaborative modes for teaching and learning in the liberal arts.

(more…)

Read More

Video Creation and the Science of Learning – tips from D. Hurlbert

Dann Hurlbert, Carleton College’s Media & Design Specialist and long-time friend of LACOL, shares three new video guides, drawing on the popular textbook e-Learning and the Science of Instruction by by Ruth Covlin Clark & Richard E. Mayer.  Visit Carleton Academic Technology blog for more tips from Dann and the Carleton ATS team: https://blogs.carleton.edu/academictechnology.

Video 1:  Making Video Work Well

In this short video, one of three in a series on the textbook, ELearning and the Science of Instruction by Ruth Covlin Clark & Richard E. Mayer, Dann Hurlbert digs into how these important concepts should impact instructional video production. The book is an in-depth, research-based look into best practices surrounding using audio and visuals in e-learning. In this first video, Dann relays how best to use the dual channels (audio and visuals) to make his or her instructional videos more engaging and more effective. (See full post.)

 

Video 2:  Talk is Cheap

In this short video, Dann Hurlbert digs into the textbook, ELearning and the Science of Instruction by Ruth Covlin Clark & Richard E. Mayer. This time, Dann relays why audio alone is often less effective online–and what simple steps an instructor can do to make his or her instructional content more engaging and more effective. (See full post.)

(more…)

Read More